Whole Grains: An Excellent Foundation For A Bad Diet

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Everyone knows that whole grains are the greatest and you should eat them with every meal. Just read any diet, fitness, or healthy living literature and you will almost certainly see a recommendation that you should eat whole grain products rather than the normal variety. But what if someone told you not to eat any grains? You would probably ignore the advice; I mean, just look at all those articles and studies out there that are telling me whole grains should be the foundation of my diet.

What would a caveman eat?

What would a caveman eat?

I’m not saying these studies are wrong; they are correct. What I’m saying is that there is a better way. The articles and studies are pretty much common sense. Of course a whole grain is going to be more nutritional than a grain that’s been processed, changed, and/or mixed with other ingredients. But what these studies fail to do is compare a diet full of whole grains to a diet of NO grains. A friend of mine said it really well; “With food there’s good, better, and best; We want to show you the best.”

When you ask someone about their “healthy diet” I can guarantee you will hear the words “I eat whole grain this and multi-grain that.” It’s pretty messed up when even the people who are actually putting forth the effort to eat healthy can’t because they don’t know what healthy is. I was one of these people! They know what sort of healthy is; they know how to eat healthier than most people, but healthier than most people isn’t saying much. We want you to be optimally healthy. I’ve told you how here.

Here’s a hypothetical Study to what we’ve all been hearing about whole grain products: A study comes out that tells us that light beer is much healthier than regular beer. More research is done and it becomes conventional wisdom that light beer is good for you. But when someone finally compares the light beer drinkers to the no beer drinkers the results show that for optimal health people should have never drank beer in the first place.

This is the same kind of thinking that has happened with grains. We’ve heard so much about how great they are that it’s become conventional wisdom that they are the miracle food; but that was only when we were comparing them to the unhealthier type grains. We’ve seen study after study touting the benefits of eating whole grains over processed grains; but the trust is that we shouldn’t be eating them in the first place. Many grains when eaten straight from the ground are toxic to humans. We just simply weren’t meant to eat them. You need to be eating food that can be eaten in it’s natural state; just as God made it. Sound familiar? An optimal diet in four words: “Meats, Vegetables, Nuts, Fruits.”

Here is a study comparing the Paleolithic diet (Meats, Vegetables, Nuts, & Fruit) to a Mediterranean-like diet (whole-grain cereals, low-fat dairy products, fruit, vegetables and refined fats generally considered healthy.)http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627225459.htm Conclusion: “If you want to prevent or treat diabetes type 2, it may be more efficient to avoid some of our modern foods than to count calories or carbohydrate.”

Here’s another: http://www.thepaleodiet.com/articles/J%20Nutr%20Environ%20Med%202003.pdf from the Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine.  Conclusion: Stroke, ischemic heart disease and type 2 diabetes seem largely preventable by way of dietary changes in a Paleolithic direction. And insulin resistance, which may have far-reaching clinical implications as a cause of unregulated tissue growth, may also respond to an ancestral diet.

And lastly: http://www.thepaleodiet.com/articles/Ancestral%20Biomedical%20Environment%20Final.pdf from the Cambridge University Press. Conclusion: Discordance between our stone-age encoding DNA and our contemporary (especially affluent) lifestyles promotes development of chronic degenerative diseases.

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  • Kirk
    Reply

    hahahhahaha

    GENIOUS. Although electric appliance by the pool..not so much Mr. Caveman

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